Making Sense of Rampage School Shootings


Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings by Katherine S. Newman

In this blog, I have written a great deal about rampage school shootings, mainly prompted by the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT. But I have been teaching about them for nearly ten years. When I was an the General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association last month, we adopted an Action of Immediate Witness “Affirming Congregational Commitment to Gun Violence Prevention.”

A few years ago, one of the members of our congregation led a service that was essentially a lecture from one of his courses. I thought that I could probably do that.

Summer Service: Making Sense of Rampage School Shootings
Sunday August 3 at 9:30 am: A few weeks ago, the General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted an Action of Immediate Witness that called for “congregational commitment to work for gun violence prevention initiatives.” The Fourth Principle of Unitarian Universalism is “A free and responsible search for truth and meaning.” What does the academic discipline of sociology have to contribute to our understanding of rampage school shootings?

Richard Hudak, President of the UUCiA, will share a close reading of Katherine S. Newman’s Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings, which he discovered on a shelf in Memorial Hall Library in Andover. This close reading is informed by nearly ten years of teaching this book to classes in complex organization, introductory sociology, the sociology of war and peace, and death and dying. Learn how this research monograph is a well-executed and important piece of public sociology, what five factors are “necessary but insufficient causes” of rampage school shootings, and what policy options may make rampage shootings less likely.

Please join in dialog about preventing gun violence.

About Richard Hudak

I am Senior Adjunct Faculty in Sociology at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and I have been a practitioner of Anusara™ yoga. I have completed 200 hours of teacher training within its diaspora community, consistent with its philosophy and alignment principles.
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